How to Best Fish a Turtle Lure

Texas Rig - (1.) Insert the hook's point into the tip of the head. (2.) Push the tip of the hook through the bottom of the lure at about 1/8- to 1/4-inch back from the tip of the head, then slide hook through the plastic until the hook's eye is located at the tip of the head, twist hook point upwards toward the belly of the lure. (3) Locate the proper distance to insert the hook point into the belly, allowing the lure to be taught between the hook's eye and hook point - this will provide the proper swim action. Embed the hook's point into the soft body, nearly exposed at the top of the lure, providing weedless retrieve and easy hook-sets.

Texas Rig - (1.) Insert the hook's point into the tip of the head. (2.) Push the tip of the hook through the bottom of the lure at about 1/8- to 1/4-inch back from the tip of the head, then slide hook through the plastic until the hook's eye is located at the tip of the head, twist hook point upwards toward the belly of the lure. (3) Locate the proper distance to insert the hook point into the belly, allowing the lure to be taught between the hook's eye and hook point - this will provide the proper swim action. Embed the hook's point into the soft body, nearly exposed at the top of the lure, providing weedless retrieve and easy hook-sets.

Sure, you can power "buzz" the turtle top-water or just below the surface to draw reactionary strikes much like you can with many other lures. But the awkward, side-to-side slow sinking action of this lure makes it unique.

The Bombshell Turtle lure is best used in a finesse bait presentation, an ultra-slow, wiggle-wiggle body-shifting drop in and around vegetation that is irresistible to big bass. It is an evolutionary-driven desire for bass to strike turtles both as species protection (turtles eat bass eggs during the bedding process) and as an easy meal throughout the year. Live turtles are not nature's best swimmers - the Bombshell Turtle has the perfect juvenile size, backward facing legs (like a real turtle) and natural awkward drop on a finesse-weighted or hook-only rig to fool bass every time!

It's in the Bass DNA to defend its Young

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Not just during the bass bedding season, bass continue to eat juvenile turtles year-around to naturally ensure survival of the bass species. Female turtles produce hundreds, if not thousands of hatchlings every year – ever wonder why our lakes are not just overwhelmed by millions of turtles? Sure, birds, snakes, racoons and other animals take their share, but bass regularly eat them to equal natures balance and as a protein source. JUVENILE TURTLES have soft shells and are easily digested whole by bass as evidenced by anglers who have found many a juvenile turtle in the gullet or stomach of their catch. SALTWATER: Good reports of success, casting the lure on top of Sargassum and allowing the lure to drop off the edge and slowly descending below the cover for aggressive saltwater strikes!

Simply put – this new lure shape fills a missing link in the standard soft-plastic lure offering. 95% of the hits on this Bombshell Turtle Lure is on the drop, so a tantalizing slow descent with its automatic leg action will draw more strikes. It can be rigged like many other soft plastic lures, “pop” the lure for multiple descents during the retrieve near underwater structure to lure big fish out of cover – let the lure do the work, pop and retrieve it s-l-o-w.

The Hybrid Bombshell Turtle Lure has an elongated shell that enables bullet-like casting and a slender body profile to allow better swimming through vegetation. This design also makes it easier for anglers to set the hook more efficiently. The elongated shell and claw-like legs can also imitate a crab profile. The legs are designed for maximum action during a weighted retrieve. Or let it descend horizontally with a slow “do-nothing” finesse action using little or no weight so that it mimics a turtle’s natural fall.

Tempting Turtle Tidbits

By Capt. Ron Presley

I have heard and read a lot about how bass like to eat baby turtles. Most accounts suggest that it is more than just being hungry. Bass hate them and attack them out of aggression. The reason: turtles like to rob bass nests and the bass don’t want them around.
Turtles are just too tempting to the fast growing Mahi-Mahi . . . .

SHELL GAME – Juvenile Turtles Tempt Bass and Other Predators

By David A. Brown
As seen in Bassin’ Magazine

Is it intentional targeting; some ill-willed adversarial relationship manifested through lethal force? Or is it classic opportunism – a momentary decision to get while the gettin’s good . . . .

The Secret Message Behind Baby Turtle Lures

by Shane Townsend

As far as I can tell, there are two kinds of people in this world: those with a soft spot for baby turtles and those without.

THE LATTER don’t deserve the sweetness of a dip cone or the comfort of two-ply toilet paper.

Thing is, baby-turtle haters look just like you and me. They walk among us. So, before you go indiscriminately breaking out the Breyers or sharing the Charmin, you may want to weed out the herpaphobes . . . .

 

Crappie World Magazine

Turtles can lay hundreds of eggs in season, producing millions of hatchlings in any given body of water. If fish such as bass, crappie and other panfish didn’t eat them, turtle populations would explode!

Fact is, panfish and many gamefish feast on turtle hatchlings – not only in spring time – but throughout the developing stages of a young turtle’s life cycle. When the shell is softer and easily digestible, panfish depend on turtles just like any other food source – worms, minnows, lizards and frogs – to survive. Mother Nature uses this as a mechanism to balance numbers as turtles, in-turn, prey on fish eggs throughout their lives.

The new Bombshell Micro Jigs fit the Micro Turtle perfectly, providing weedless jigging and a premium, super-sharp Maruto hook.